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Victoria: Current Attainment Status

Compliance of Victoria County with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

Victoria Area: Attainment Status by Pollutant

Pollutant

 

Primary NAAQS

 

Averaging Period

 

Designation

 

Counties

 

Attainment Deadline

Ozone (O3)*

0.075 ppm
(2008 standard)

8-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

Victoria

 

0.08 ppm (1997 standard)

8-hour

Attainment (Maintenance)

Victoria

 

Lead (Pb)

0.15 µg/m3
(2008 standard)

Rolling 3-Month Average

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

1.5 µg/m3
(1978 standard)

Quarterly Average

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

9 ppm

8-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

35 ppm

1-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)

0.053 ppm

Annual

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

100 ppb

1-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

Particulate Matter
(PM10)

150 µg/m3

24-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

12.0 µg/m3(2012 standard)

Annual (Arithmetic Mean)

Pending

 

 

15.0 µg/m3(1997 standard)

Annual (Arithmetic Mean)

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

35 µg/m3

24-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)

0.03 ppm**

Annual (Arithmetic Mean)

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

0.14 ppm**

24-hour

Attainment/ Unclassifiable

 

 

75 ppb

1-hour

Governor's Recommendation: Unclassifiable

 

 

*The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revoked the one-hour ozone standard in all areas, although some areas have continuing obligations under the standard. See ozone history for more information.

**Standard will be revoked one year after the effective date of final designations for the 75 ppb standard.

Victoria Attainment Areas

2008 Eight-Hour Ozone Standard Designation: Attainment/Unclassifiable, effective July 20, 2012 (77 FR 30088) Exit the TCEQ
On March 27, 2008, the EPA lowered the primary and secondary eight-hour ozone NAAQS to 0.075 parts per million (73 FR 16436) Exit the TCEQ. Victoria County was designated attainment/unclassifiable under the 2008 eight-hour ozone NAAQS, effective July 20, 2012.

1997 Eight-Hour Ozone Standard Designation:  Attainment, April 30, 2004 (69 FR 23858Exit the TCEQ
On April 30, 2004, the EPA designated Victoria County attainment for the 1997 eight-hour ozone NAAQS with an effective date of June 15, 2004. States with areas designated attainment for both the 1997 eight-hour ozone standard and the one-hour ozone standard with an approved one-hour maintenance plan were required to submit a 10-year maintenance plan for the 1997 eight-hour standard. On March 7, 2007, the commission approved the 1997 Eight-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan for the Victoria County area.

One-Hour Ozone Standard Designation: Attainment, March 7, 1995 (60 FR 12453) Exit the TCEQ
On March 7, 1995, the EPA redesignated Victoria County as attainment for the one-hour ozone standard, effective May 8, 1995. The state submitted a second maintenance plan to the EPA on February 18, 2003, and the EPA published a direct final rule approving the maintenance plan on January 3, 2005 (70 FR 53).

National Ambient Air Quality Standards

The EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards Exit the TCEQ(NAAQS) for six principal criteria pollutants: ground-level ozone, lead, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter. 

No later than one year after promulgation of a new or revised NAAQS for any pollutant, the governor must submit designation recommendations to the EPA for all areas of the state. The EPA must then promulgate the designations within two years of promulgation of the revised NAAQS. Areas that do not meet (or contribute to ambient air quality in a nearby area that does not meet) the NAAQS are designated nonattainment. Areas that meet the NAAQS are designated attainment; and areas that cannot be classified based on the available information, unclassifiable.

For ozone, the Federal Clean Air Act establishes nonattainment area classifications ranked according to the severity of the area’s air pollution problem. These classifications—marginal, moderate, serious, severe, and extreme—translate to varying requirements with which Texas and nonattainment areas must comply.