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Water Shortage Issue Related to the Mexican Water Deficit

Documents and information pertaining to the TCEQ's position on Rio Grande water distribution between the United States and Mexico.

 

Issue

The failure of Mexico to consistently deliver water in accordance with the 1944 water treaty between the United States and Mexico significantly harms Texas interests.

The treaty requires delivery from certain tributaries in Mexico to the United States of not less than an average of 350,000 acre feet annually, in cycles of five consecutive years. Mexico has failed to deliver the amount of water owed resulting in hardship for Texas' water users who rely on that water for irrigation, as well as municipalities that need the irrigation water to convey public drinking water supplies.

The International Boundary and Water Commission, in conjunction with the U.S. State Department, has the responsibility to enforce the treaty, but has not been successful in doing so in spite of the fact that the United States has implemented actions to the benefit of Mexico on numerous occasions.

Rio Grande Watermaster Reports

Reservoir Levels

This report is for the week ending 04/05/2014.

  • The current cycle began on October 25, 2010.
  • The pro-rated deficit as of 04/05/2014 is 310,482 AF for this cycle.
  • During the first year of the cycle, Mexico delivered 288,309 AF, during the second year 100,401 AF, during the third year 392,142 AF and to date 114,008 AF for the fourth year.
  • The running total of deliveries for this 5-year cycle is 894,860 AF.
  • On April 5, 2014, the U.S. combined ownership at Amistad/Falcon stood at 45.03% of normal conservation capacity, impounding 1,527,378 acre-feet, up from 34.73% (1,177,962 AF) of normal conservation a year ago at this time.
  • As of 04/05/2014, the United States has 899,888 AF in Amistad and 627,490 AF in Falcon.
  • Mexico has 609,654 AF in Amistad and 440,216 AF in Falcon.
  • The Amistad Reservoir is currently at: 1081.79 ft -35.31 with a release of 20.0 cms/706 cfs
  • Falcon Reservoir is currently at: 276.74 ft -24.46 with a release of 15.0 cms/530 cfs

Ownership of Water – Amistad/Falcon

Report dated 4/12/2014.

On April 12, 2014, the U.S. combined ownership at Amistad/Falcon stood at 44.58% of normal conservation capacity, impounding 1,511,974 acre-feet, up from 33.34% (1,130,940 AF) of normal conservation a year ago at this time. Overall the system is holding 42.49% of normal conservation capacity, impounding 2,516,444 acre-feet with Amistad at 44.97% of conservation capacity, impounding 1,473,060 acre-feet and Falcon at 39.42% of conservation capacity, impounding 1,043,384 acre-feet. Mexico has 39.70% of normal conservation capacity, impounding 1,004,470 acre-feet at Amistad/Falcon.

Resolutions

Letters Pertaining to Mexican Water Deficit

IBWC's Minute 309 and Letters