Skip to Content
Questions or Comments: monops@tceq.texas.gov

Today's Texas Air Quality Forecast

The latest forecast for air quality conditions in Texas' metropolitan areas.

Envelope icon for e-mail sign up Sign up for email updates

April 12, 2024

Forecast is for Ozone, PM2.5, & PM10, and is based on EPA's Air Quality Index (AQI)

Forecast Region
(Click name for AIRNOW version)
Fri
04/12/2024
Sat
04/13/2024
Sun
04/14/2024
Mon
04/15/2024
Tue
04/16/2024
Amarillo Ozone Ozone Ozone Good Good
Austin Ozone Good PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Beaumont-Port Arthur Ozone Good PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Big Bend Ozone Good Good PM2.5 Good
Brownsville-McAllen Ozone/PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Bryan-College Station Ozone Good Good PM2.5 PM2.5
Corpus Christi Ozone PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Dallas-Fort Worth Ozone Good Good PM2.5 PM2.5
El Paso Ozone/PM2.5/PM10 Ozone/PM2.5/PM10 Ozone/PM2.5/PM10 PM2.5/PM10 PM2.5/PM10
Houston Ozone Ozone PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Laredo Ozone PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Lubbock Ozone Ozone Ozone Good Good
Midland-Odessa Ozone Ozone Ozone Good Good
San Antonio Ozone Good PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Tyler-Longview Ozone Good PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Victoria Ozone Good PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
Waco-Killeen Ozone Good PM2.5 PM2.5 PM2.5
An asterisk (*) indicates that an Ozone Action Day is or will be in effect for the indicated region.
A caret (^) indicates that levels of PM may exceed the applicable short-term NAAQS. For more information see the following TCEQ websites:Air Pollution from Particulate Matter and Voluntary Tips for Citizens and Business to Reduce Emissions.

Forecast Discussion

Warm temperatures, abundant afternoon sunshine, and/or elevated incoming background levels could be enough for ozone to reach the upper end of the "Moderate" range or possibly higher in the central part and north side of the Houston area, the lower to middle of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Amarillo, Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Big Bend, Bryan-College-Station, Brownsville-McAllen, Corpus Christi, Dallas-Fort Worth, El Paso, Laredo, Lubbock, Midland-Odessa, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, Victoria, and Waco-Killeen areas.

As the high-pressure system slowly moves East, southerly winds will increase throughout Texas with higher wind speeds over the Western half of the state as a tightening pressure gradient develops in the Central Plains. Lower humidity values could temper fine particulate concentrations in the Eastern and Southeastern regions, but urban haze due to lighter wind speeds could still create conditions that are conducive for slightly elevated PM2.5 at times. Meanwhile, very light amounts of residual smoke/aerosols could begin to encroach on the southernmost portions of Texas due to ongoing burning and industrial activity in Mexico and Central America, but the overall daily PM2.5 AQI is forecast to top out in the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Brownsville-McAllen area and the upper end of the "Good" range in a majority of the Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Corpus Christi, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, Laredo, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, Victoria, and Waco-Killeen areas.

Light winds, limited vertical mixing, and very light residual smoke advecting out of northern Mexico could keep the daily PM2.5/PM10 AQI in the lower to middle end of the "Moderate" range in portions of Far West Texas, which includes the El Paso area.

Otherwise and elsewhere across the state, moderate to strong winds, mild temperatures, and/or lower incoming background levels should help keep air quality in the "Good" range for most areas.

Warm temperatures, abundant afternoon sunshine, and/or elevated incoming background levels could be enough for ozone to reach the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Amarillo, El Paso, Houston, Lubbock, and Midland-Odessa areas and the upper end of the "Good" range in parts of the Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Big Bend, Brownsville-McAllen, Bryan-College-Station, Corpus Christi, Dallas-Fort Worth, Laredo, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, Victoria, and Waco-Killeen areas.

Southerly flow on the backside of the high-pressure system over the Southeast United States will result in warmer and gradually moistening conditions over much of the state, however, moderate to breezy winds are expected to provide sufficient pollutant dispersion as model guidance suggests a lack of significant smoke density and coverage. Very light smoke associated with burning in Mexico and Central America could affect fine particulate concentrations in South/Southwest and South-Central Texas with daily PM2.5 AQI values reaching the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Brownsville-McAllen, Corpus Christi, and Laredo areas and the upper end of the "Good" range in the Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Houston, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, and Victoria areas.

Limited vertical mixing combined with a large wind shift that may promote air mass re-circulation could help the daily PM2.5/PM10 AQI stay in the lower to middle end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the El Paso area.

Otherwise and elsewhere across the state, moderate winds, mild temperatures, and/or lower incoming background levels should help keep air quality in the "Good" range for most areas.

Warm temperatures, abundant afternoon sunshine, and/or elevated incoming background levels could be enough for ozone to reach the lower to middle of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Amarillo, El Paso, Lubbock, and Midland-Odessa areas.

A greater influx of Gulf moisture due to persistent southerly flow will make conditions more conducive for fine particulate formation in the eastern two thirds of Texas on Sunday. Higher density smoke is forecast to slowly be transported farther inland with the South- and South-Central regions as well as the coastal bend seeing the most pronounced effects. The daily PM2.5 AQI is forecast to increase into the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Brownsville-McAllen, Corpus Christi, Houston, Laredo, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, Victoria, and Waco-Killeen areas and the upper end of the "Good" range in most of the Bryan-College Station and Dallas-Fort Worth areas.

Light morning winds, limited vertical mixing, and very light residual smoke in Far West Texas could sustain the daily PM2.5/PM10 AQI in the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the El Paso area.

Otherwise and elsewhere across the state, moderate winds, mild temperatures, and/or lower incoming background levels should help keep air quality in the "Good" range for most areas.

A strong cold front is forecast to bring gusty to windy conditions to the western third of Texas during the afternoon and evening hours on Monday. Patchy blowing dust appears likely at times in addition to any transported dust from New Mexico and Northern Mexico. The daily PM2.5/PM10 AQI is forecast to reach the middle to upper end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the El Paso area, the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Big Bend area, and the upper end of the "Good" range in a majority of the Amarillo, Lubbock, and Midland-Odessa areas.

Southerly winds ahead of the cold front will continue transporting high relative humidity into the eastern two thirds of Texas in addition to slowly increasing amounts of residual smoke out of Mexico. While breezy conditions could facilitate pollutant dispersion, the high relative humidity combined juxtaposed any residual smoke that is advected northward is expected to keep fine particulate matter elevated in several regions. The daily PM2.5 AQI is forecast to reach the middle of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Brownsville-McAllen, Corpus Christi, and Laredo areas, the lower end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Bryan-College Station, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, Victoria, and Waco-Killeen areas.

Otherwise and elsewhere across the state, strong winds, mild temperatures, and/or lower incoming background levels should help keep air quality in the "Good" range for most areas.

Lingering suspended dust kicked up from the previous day could linger in portions of the Permian Basin, Panhandle, and Far West Texas as breezy winds continue across the three regions. Additional patchy blowing dust could remain a concern as winds in New Mexico remain elevated. The daily PM2.5 AQI is forecast to net out in the lower to middle end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the El Paso area and the upper end of the "Good" range in most of the Amarillo, Lubbock, and Midland-Odessa areas.

The aforementioned cold front will track into Central Texas by the late morning hours before eventually lifting northward as the attendant low-pressure system heads toward the Upper Midwest. Southerly winds ahead of the front will continue to advect moisture out of the Gulf and residual smoke out of Mexico, likely keeping fine particulate matter elevated particularly in the southern and coastal regions. The daily PM2.5 AQI is forecast to net out in the middle to upper end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Brownsville-McAllen, Corpus Christi, and Laredo areas, the lower to middle end of the "Moderate" range in parts of the Austin, Beaumont-Port Arthur, Bryan-College Station, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, Tyler-Longview, Victoria, and Waco-Killeen areas.

Otherwise and elsewhere across the state, moderate to strong winds, mild temperatures, and/or lower incoming background levels should help keep air quality in the "Good" range for most areas.

This forecast was last updated at 11:35 AM on Friday, April 12th and is updated daily on normal TCEQ workdays and may also be updated on weekends or holidays when air pollution levels are high. Regardless of our forecast, we always recommend that each individual determine what level of activity they should conduct based on the actual local conditions. See the "Related Current Data" links below to monitor the latest actual conditions.

Envelope icon for e-mail sign up Sign up for email updates

Related Items