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AQI and Data Reports

Air quality index reports, airborne particulates, ozone, and meteorological and climatological data.

Air Quality Index (AQI)

The AQI scale is divided into the following categories:

AQI Air Quality Scale

Each National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQSExit the TCEQ) pollutant has a separate AQI scale, with an AQI rating of 100 corresponding to the concentration where health effects for each pollutant begin to affect the general public. AQI ratings below 100 indicate no appreciable health risk. Additional information about the AQI and how it can be used is available from the EPAExit the TCEQ.

The AQI for ozone is based on the either the peak eight-hour running average since midnight OR the peak one-hour measurement since midnight. The AQIs for PM-10 and PM-2.5 are based on a 24-hour average sampled from midnight to midnight. The AQI for carbon monoxide is based on the peak eight-hour running average since midnight. The AQI for sulfur dioxide is based on the either the peak one-hour measurement since midnight OR the peak 24-hour average sampled since midnight. On most days the critical pollutant is ozone. Ozone one-hour average concentrations of 125 ppb or higher exceed the old NAAQS. The new NAAQS for ozone is based on eight-hour averages; an eight-hour average of 71 ppb exceeds the new NAAQS for ozone.

View the current Air Quality Index (AQI) values by region and site.

Ozone Reports

Ozone: The Facts
Sound science and targeted regulations have greatly reduced ozone concentrations in Texas cities and across the nation.

Voluntary Steps in Helping Prevent Ozone
These simple tips will help you save money while protecting the Texas environment.

Houston

Texas Cities' Compliance with Eight-Hour Ozone Standard
Report for the fourth highest daily maximum eight-hour average ozone concentrations in Texas Metropolitan areas.


Daily Maximum Eight-Hour Ozone Averages
Maximum eight-hour ozone averages measured daily from yesterday back to 1997.


Four Highest Eight-Hour Ozone Concentrations
Calculated from TCEQ monitoring site data available from today back to 1997.


Eight-Hour Ozone High Value Days
Averages that meet or exceed 85 parts per billion ozone. Data available from one hour ago back to 1997.

Ozone Hourly Averages

Click a region to get a list of hourly averages.

tceq regions region 1 region 2 region 6 region 7 region 3 region 4 region 5 region 8 region 9 region 10 region 11 region 16 region 13 region 15 region 14 region 12

PLEASE NOTE: This data has not been verified by the TCEQ and may change. This is the most current data, but it is not official until it has been certified by our technical staff. Data is collected from TCEQ ambient monitoring sites and may include data collected by other outside agencies. This data is updated hourly. All times shown are in local standard time unless otherwise indicated.


High One-Hour Ozone Values
Measurements of high one-hour ozone concentrations.


High Ozone Summary
Table that summarizes high one-hour averages greater than 125 ppb and eight-hour ozone averages greater than 76 ppb in Texas metropolitan areas.


Peak Daily One-Hour Ozone Averages
Maximum one-hour ozone averages measured daily from yesterday back to 1996.

Airborne Particulates

Shows how much smaller pm2.5 is than human hair or sand

Airborne particulates (example: dust, smoke, respiratory droplets containing viruses or bacteria) are also referred to as particulate matter or PM. Some are large enough to be seen with the naked eye, while others are so small they can only be seen with a microscope. These can come from natural sources like pollen, dust and wildfires; or from human activity, such as vehicle emissions and some industrial processes. These particles can be classified according to their size and their chemical composition, such as PM2.5 (particles 2.5 microns or less in size or PM10 (particles 10 microns or less in size).


View Airborne Particulates tables

Tables summarizing the measured averages of fine particulates (particles 2.5 microns or less in size) and coarse particulates (particles 10 microns or less in size) from the air in Texas metropolitan areas.


PM2.5 (particulate matter) are fine particles and are the smallest particles that are regulated. They consist of particles that are less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers in diameter. By comparison, the average diameter of human hair is 70 micrometers.

As they are so small, PM2.5 can easily travel through your respiratory tract into your lungs and your bloodstream, where they can cause various health problems. Health effects of high concentrations can include: irregular heartbeat, aggravated asthma, decreased lung function, respiratory problems, nonfatal heart attacks, and premature death in people with heart or lung disease. With knowledge of the level of air pollutants in your area, you are able to actively take steps to protect from the negative effects by limiting outdoor activity.


Current PM2.5 Hourly Averages by Region
The TCEQ’s monitoring of particulate matter 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter, measured at each region.

Click a region to get a list of hourly averages.

TCEQ Regions region 1 region 2 region 6 region 7 region 3 region 4 region 5 region 8 region 9 region 10 region 11 region 16 region 13 region 15 region 14 region 12

Four Highest 24-Hour PM2.5 Concentrations
Retrieve the four highest 24-hour PM2.5 (local conditions) acceptable concentration averages from data collected at TCEQ monitoring sites beginning January 1, 1998 through today.

Daily, Monthly, and Yearly Data Reports

AQI Air Quality Scale

Daily Hourly Data:

Hourly Data
Hourly averages for all the pollutants and meteorological conditions measured by the TCEQ at each monitoring site.

Map
Use our interactive map to find hourly averaged data.

Monthly Hourly Data:

Monthly Data
Monthly summaries of the hourly averages for all the pollutants and meteorological conditions measured by the TCEQ at each monitoring site.

Map
Use our interactive map to find monthly averaged data.

Yearly Hourly Data:

Yearly Data
Yearly summaries of the hourly averages for all the pollutants and meteorological conditions measured by the TCEQ at each monitoring site.

Map
Use our interactive map to find yearly averaged data.


Hourly Air Pollution Data by Pollutant
Search for measurements of particular air pollutants found at TCEQ monitoring sites statewide.


Daily Summary Report By Site
A daily summary of hourly data collected at TCEQ's (and other select monitoring entities) continuous ambient monitoring stations.


Monthly Summary Report By Site
A monthly summary of hourly data collected at TCEQ's (and other select monitoring entities) continuous ambient monitoring stations.

Meteorological and Climatological

Current radar profiler and visibility web camera images.

Current measurements of winds in the lower atmosphere, which help determine the movement of air pollution across Texas. Wind measurements from these profilers are used to determine the transport of air pollution and to help validate model-generated wind fields used for air quality modeling.

La Porte Current Wind Plot

La Porte Current Wind Plot

Dallas-Fort Worth, Cleburne Airport Current Wind Plot

Dallas-Fort Worth, Cleburne Airport Current Wind Plot

How It Works

The radar profilers transmit radio wave pulses into the atmosphere and then record the resulting backscattered radio waves to measure winds in the range from 137 meters (449 feet) to 3,601 meters (11,814 feet) above ground level.

Real-time wind data plots are generated every 30 minutes from the radar profilers and relayed to this Web site for display. The plots show the last 12 hours of wind profiles. The wind data are plotted in standard meteorological form, with a vector line indicating the wind direction and barbs indicating the wind speed. The barbs are plotted on the tail of the wind vector (the end where the wind is coming from). Each full barb indicates five meters per second of wind speed (about 10 knots or 12 miles per hour) and a half-barb indicates 2.5 meters per second (about five knots or six miles per hour). The wind plots are colorized for wind speed using the color scale shown on the right side of the plot.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Data

Data from the TCEQ radar profilers are available from NOAA's Multi-Agency Profiler Graphical Data DisplaysExit the TCEQ.

Images showing visibility and meteorological conditions in El Paso, Big Bend National Park, and the Davis and Franklin Mountains.

These images are provided as a courtesy as often as conditions allow.

Panther Junction

Big Bend Panther Junction

McDonald Observatory

McDonald Observatory

Chisos Basin

Big Bend Chisos Basin

image not available

El Paso Chelsea St.

Image Not Available

El Paso Chelsea St.

Ranger Peak

El Paso Ranger Peak

Ranger Peak

El Paso Ranger Peak

ranger composite markers

Visibility Markers

Additional Web Camera of Big Bend National Park - National Park Service Exit the TCEQ

Data from the EPA AIR DATA page

The AirDataExit the TCEQ website gives you access to air quality data collected at outdoor monitors across the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U. S. Virgin Islands. The data comes primarily from the AQS (Air Quality System) database. You can choose from several ways of looking at the data:

  • download data into a file (or view it on the screen)
  • output the data into one of AirData’s standard reports
  • create graphical displays using one of the visualization tools
  • investigate monitor locations using an interactive map

AirData lets you display and download monitored hourly, daily, and annual concentration data, AQI data, and speciated particle pollution data.